News from our guides in the field

Epic Everest Update #4

Rest day- Namchebazar, 19 April

Written by Brad Horn on Sunday, 20 April 2014. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Epic Everest Update #4
19 April: Today was a rest day at Namchebazar (3300 metres). These “rest” days are important for the acclimatisation process to the altitude. We did nonetheless spend the morning on an acclimatisation trek up to the Everest View Hotel (3880 metres). The hotel offered awesome views of Ama Dablam (6812 metres) and Thamserku (6623 metres). Unfortunately Everest was shrouded in cloud however, I am sure that we will have ample opportunity in due course. We also visited Khumjung village in the valley below. This village’s school and hospital has been heavily supported by the Sir Edmund Hillary Foundation.  The afternoon was spent finalising ...

Epic Everest Update #3

Trek to Basecamp, 17/18 April

Written by Brad Horn on Saturday, 19 April 2014. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Epic Everest Update #3
You may have heard news of the recent tragic events on Everest with the avalanche. Rest assured that Brad, Kevin and Ake are fine. They are still 5 days from Base camp. Our hearts go out to the friends and families of the Sherpas that lost their lives. 17 April: Had an early start for the flight into Lukla. The 35 minute flight was spectacular as we skirted the high snowcapped peaks on our left. The landing at Lukla was interesting to say the least. The airstrip is steeply uphill so no need to wear the brake pads out! ...

Epic Everest Update #2

Kathmandu, 16 April

Written by Brad Horn on Thursday, 17 April 2014. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Epic Everest Update #2
16 April: We arrived into Kathmandu yesterday after an uneventful flight, via KL. The weather here is beautifully warm and sunny at 24°C. We are staying at a very comfortable hotel called the Yak & Yeti, which is centrally located in town. Kathmandu is very similar in some ways to the cities in northern India. Of course there is a fair degree of commonality in the cultures with Buddhism and Hinduism being the dominant religions. Like India, the traffic is chaotic with the beeping of car horns the order of the day. We spent yesterday afternoon settling in and we had a briefing ...

An Epic Ugandan Safari

Written by Rob Barbour on Tuesday, 15 April 2014. Posted in News from our guides in the field

An Epic Ugandan Safari
Rob Barbour from Epic Private Journeys here. I have just returned from a fabulous couple of weeks in Uganda, guiding a group of 8 people who were experiencing this magical country for the first time. Uganda is unique in that not only is it a great destination to see the few remaining mountain gorillas, but it also offers chimpanzee trekking and the opportunity to view several other primate species. We visited the remote Kidepo National Park in north-eastern Uganda to add a more traditional safari component to the trip. Kidepo National Park has large herds of buffalo and good numbers of lion that prey on ...

Epic Everest Update #1

Written by Brad Horn on Thursday, 03 April 2014. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Epic Everest Update #1
It has been a pretty intense couple of months on the training front in preparation for the climb. I have continued doing what I ordinarily do; weights, swimming, cycling and running but have supplemented this with some more specific training. I have been doing 3 pack trekking sessions a week. At least one of those has been walking a nearby hill near my home, Gower St, with my pack on dragging a tyre. Ordinarily I do 15/16 repetitions of the hill which takes me I hour 30 minutes. Must say you get some pretty strange looks from people driving past. ...

An 'Active' Safari through Northern Tanzania

Written by Richard Field on Thursday, 19 December 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

An 'Active' Safari through Northern Tanzania
In July this year, I accompanied a wonderful family from the US on an active safari through northern Tanzania. This included a mix of mountain biking and walking through community wildlife conservancies and rural areas, hiking in the Ngorongoro highlands as well as more traditional safari and game viewing through Tarangire, Lake Manyara, the Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti. This safari offering is unique. Being on bikes and on foot it allows for plenty of wonderful, spontaneous and absolutely authentic cultural interaction. There were times when we would ride through a small village and all the villagers would line the road ...

Climbing Kilimanjaro

5 key points from a novice climber!

Written by Richard Field on Thursday, 19 December 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Climbing Kilimanjaro
I am a safari guide, and climbing mountains has never really been my focus. However, having lived and loved Africa as long as I have, Mt Kilimanjaro was always something that I had wanted to do, and in July the dream became reality. As a ‘novice’ climber I was concerned about how my body would adjust to the altitude. With a brand new baby daughter in the family, I was also concerned that I hadn’t put enough time and effort into my pre-climb fitness regime. As it turned out, I did manage to summit, as did all of our group and ...

Wildman Wilderness Lodge

Written by Marg O'Connor on Friday, 04 October 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Wildman Wilderness Lodge
Pedro and I were privileged to stay at Wildman Wilderness Lodge and experience the Northern Territory (NT) at its best. Everything in NT is big – the landscapes are expansive, the crocodiles are enormous, the anthills resemble small high-rise buildings, the storm clouds tower above the horizon and the hospitality is extremely warm and welcoming. Wildman Wilderness Lodge is an intimate safari-style lodge situated about 170 kilometres (about 2 hours drive) from Darwin. The lodge comprises of a central lodge, 10 air-conditioned cabins (‘Habitats’) and 15 Safari Tents, all which en-suite bathrooms. The view from your room is across the floodplain ...

Lord Howe Island

Written by Marg O'Connor on Friday, 04 October 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Lord Howe Island
Lord Howe Island – the island that time forgot. Set foot on Lord Howe Island and you take a step back to a time when you knew your neighbour’s names and were always welcomed with a friendly "g’day". Lord Howe Island sits in the Pacific Ocean about 700 kilometres north-east of Sydney and boasts a population of 300 permanent residents, as well as rugged volcanic peaks, lush forests, rolling surf and serene lagoons. It is surrounded by the southern-most coral reef in the world and gained World Heritage listing in recognition of its pristine natural heritage. Around 75% of the island ...

Lizard Island

Written by Marg O'Connor on Friday, 04 October 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Lizard Island
Lizard Island – the jewel of the Great Barrier Reef – is the most luxurious place to relax, recharge and explore the underwater wonderland of corals and sea creatures. With 24 powder white sand beaches it truly is the perfect place to lose yourself. There are not many islands on the Great Barrier Reef that you can snorkel from your doorstep, but on Lizard Island you can. Catering to only 82 guests (13 years and over) at any one time it is very easy to find a secluded beach to enjoy a picnic lunch and really feel like you are the ...

Flores

Written by Marg O'Connor on Friday, 04 October 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Flores
Flores – the Island of Flowers – in Indonesia is one of the friendliest places on the planet! The distant sound of "hello mister" accompanies you wherever you go on the island. Situated to the east of Bali, with a population of 1.8 million it is home to the famous Komodo Dragons. The simple subsistence lifestyle allows life to crawl by at a very relaxed pace. We started our Flores adventure in Labuan Bajo on the western side of the island. It felt like we had landed, not only in paradise, but on the set of a "Pirates of the Caribbean" ...

Barossa & Clare Valleys

Written by Marg O'Connor on Friday, 04 October 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Barossa & Clare Valleys
A visit to Australia’s premier wine region, the Barossa and Clare Valleys, never disappoints. The mild Mediterranean climate, rich soils and sunny skies makes for a gourmet food and wine experience that is second to none. Situated to the north-east of Adelaide in South Australia the Barossa and Clare Valleys are unlike any other wine regions in the world, with 150 years of tradition and culture, fuelled by centuries of European experience. While the entire Barossa region is renowned for its luscious shiraz, the Clare and Eden Valley's cooler climates produce what are regarded as some of the best rieslings in ...

Arkaba Station

Written by Marg O'Connor on Thursday, 03 October 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Arkaba Station
If I was asked to name one of my favourite destinations in Australia, Arkaba Station in the Flinders Ranges would be in my top 10. The rawness of the ancient landscape moulded by millions of years of geological activity and weathering has produced some of Australia’s most spectacular outback scenery. Arkaba is a 60,000 acre sheep ‘station’; its craggy sandstone bluffs and dry creek beds lined with River Red Gums are a quintessential Australian scene. For wildlife watching, bush-walking, photography, Aboriginal rock art or just soaking up the sights and sounds of outback Australia, the Flinders is in a class of ...

A Return to the Zambezi

Written by Richard Field on Wednesday, 26 June 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

A Return to the Zambezi
My first job in the safari industry was building and managing a small safari camp in Zambia's Lower Zambezi National Park. It was 1996 and I was a very green 22 year old who had just finished university and really didn't know very much about anything at all! I lasted 6 months before the daily challenges of living and working in such an isolated and remote place eventually became too much. The job required someone more experienced and I needed to somewhere that I could be trained and mentored.   In May this year, I returned to the Lower Zambezi for the ...

Out of Season Travel

Written by Rob Barbour on Monday, 10 June 2013. Posted in News from our guides in the field

Out of Season Travel
Most people travel to Africa during the drier months to escape the rain and mud and to easier see the wildlife which normally concentrates around the water courses.  With the shorter, drier grass and the concentration of wildlife -  often the sitings are more prevalent, Having said this there are plenty of good reasons not to follow this widely held logic as was illustrated so perfectly for me when I traveled to the Ndutu area of the southern Serengeti in late April.   Traditionally Ndutu is supposedly at it's best between December and March when the vast herds of migrating wildebeest congregate on ...

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